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Are you worried about showing signs of aging? See this list of powerful age-defying foods!

March 30, 2014

We all know that eating the right foods can have a positive effect on how young we feel and look. But there are some foods that possess specific age-defying qualities that you will want to be sure to include in your diet as you age! Take a look at the foods that made the list of powerful age-defying foods below.


Whether it’s hot or cold, aim for whole grain, high-fiber and low added-sugar cereals. Whole grains contain hundreds of natural plant compounds, called “phytochemicals,” that protect cells from damage, which can cause diseases or further the aging process. Antioxidants, phenols, lignans, and saponins are specific components found in whole grains that can decrease our risk of cancer. But don’t be fooled by cereal boxes carrying the “made with whole grain” label. Just because a food is made with whole grains, does not mean it contains 100% whole grains, or does not have any added sugars. Choose cereals with at least three grams of fiber and as little sugar as possible. Unflavored oatmeal, plain shredded wheat, and unsweetened puffed rice make for great choices.

Muesli is a popular breakfast choice that typically combines rolled oats and other whole grains, fresh or dried fruits, and nuts and seeds. It can be heated like porridge, served cold with any type of milk, mixed into yogurt with fresh berries, or used in baked goods. Try these Chocolate Chip Applesauce Muesli Cookies from Bob’s Red Mill® as a way to secretly include more whole grains in your family’s diet.


I recently wrote about the benefits of nuts and their cancer-defying properties. But when it comes to nuts, portion control is key. One serving of whole, raw nuts is about 1 ounce, or a small handful; when choosing nut butters, 2 Tbsp (a golf ball) is considered a portion size.

Not only can they provide great flavor to foods, but nuts also contain a high amount of monounsaturated fats, specifically omega-3 fatty acids, along with minerals, protein, and fiber. Did you know that just one whole Brazil nut contains up to 137% daily value of selenium, a mineral that may help reduce a man’s risk of prostate cancer? This Harvest Trail Mix from Cascadian Farm® Organic can add the perfect crunch to a salad, yogurt, or by itself as an afternoon snack.


The health benefits of eggs have been controversial for years. We have been told to either totally avoid them or eat only the whites. But according to the American Heart Association, whole eggs can fit within heart-healthy guidelines if cholesterol from other sources, such as meats, poultry and dairy products, is limited. Eggs are also a great source of complete protein, meaning that they contain all eight of the “essential” amino acids.

Boiled eggs make a great, portable snack when you are on the go. Their protein and fat content will help you feel fuller longer, which can decrease your overall calorie intake. Or, include eggs in your weekend brunch by making this delicious Spinach Frittata from the Mayo Clinic.


We have been conditioned to avoid potatoes due to their carbohydrate content. However, carbohydrates are an essential part of our diet because they provide energy to your brain, red blood cells, and the whole nervous system. Carbohydrates also have the power to boost our mood and decrease depression, as they increase brain serotonin production and release. This “feel-good” neurotransmitter can also improve learning, memory and sleeping patterns, helping your brain defy the laws of aging.

Sweet potatoes can take these benefits a step further with their high content of antioxidants, including vitamins A and C. Just 1 cup of cooked sweet potato contains over 750% of your daily need of vitamin A! Try making this Sweet Potato-and-Ginger Soup - for only five ingredients and 90 calories per serving, you will get a lot of nutrition bang-for-your-buck!

Happy Eating!

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