Absent Pulmonary Valve -- Child

An absent pulmonary valve is a rare heart defect. In a normal heart, blood flows from the body into the right atrium and on to the right ventricle. Blood is then pumped out of the heart through the pulmonary artery to the lungs. The blood picks up fresh oxygen in the lungs. The blood returns to the left atrium of the heart and goes into the left ventricle. There it is pumped out through the aorta to deliver oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body. With this defect, the pulmonary valve does not develop properly. The opening where the valve should be is also narrowed. The defect causes the blood moving from the right ventricle to the arteries leading to the lungs to build up. This build-up causes swelling of these arteries that can put pressure on the air passages in the lungs. The condition can be mild to severe. It usually occurs with other heart defects, like tetralogy of Fallot (a group of heart defects), or with an opening between the ventricles called a ventricular septal defect .

  • Causes

    Absent pulmonary valve is a congenital defect. This means that the baby is born with it. It is not known exactly why some babies’ hearts develop abnormally.

  • Definition

    An absent pulmonary valve is a rare heart defect.

    In a normal heart, blood flows from the body into the right atrium and on to the right ventricle. Blood is then pumped out of the heart through the pulmonary artery to the lungs. The blood picks up fresh oxygen in the lungs. The blood returns to the left atrium of the heart and goes into the left ventricle. There it is pumped out through the aorta to deliver oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body.

    Heart Chambers and Valves
    heart anatomy
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    Blood Flow Through the Heart
    IMAGE
    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

    With this defect, the pulmonary valve does not develop properly. The opening where the valve should be is also narrowed. The defect causes the blood moving from the right ventricle to the arteries leading to the lungs to build up. This build-up causes swelling of these arteries that can put pressure on the air passages in the lungs.


    The condition can be mild to severe. It usually occurs with other heart defects, like
    tetralogy of Fallot
    (a group of heart defects), or with an opening between the ventricles called a
    ventricular septal defect
    .

    Ventricular Septal Defect
    Ventral septal defect
    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • Diagnosis

    The doctor will ask about your child’s symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done. Tests may include:

    • Echocardiogram
      —an imaging test that uses sound waves to look at the size, shape, and motion of the heart
    • Chest x-ray
      —an imaging test that uses low amounts of radiation to create an image of the chest
    • Electrocardiogram
      —a test that measures the electrical activity of the heart
    • MRI scan
      —a test that uses magnetic waves to make pictures of structures inside the chest
    • CT scan
      —a type of x-ray that uses a computer to make pictures of structures inside the chest
    • Cardiac catheterization
      —a test that uses a catheter (tube) and x-ray machine to assess the heart and its blood supply

  • Prevention

    In most cases, there is no way to prevent absent pulmonary valve in your child. Getting proper prenatal care is always important.

  • Risk Factors

    Some risk factors for congenital heart diseases like absent pulmonary valve may include:

    • Family history of congenital heart defect
    • Child has certain chromosomal disorders

    • Previous pregnancy with fetal heart abnormalities or
      miscarriage

  • Symptoms

    Symptoms may include:

    • Blue or pale grayish skin color
    • Trouble breathing
    • Coughing
    • Poor feeding/poor weight gain


    This condition can lead to
    heart failure
    . If your child has any of these symptoms, get medical care right away.

  • Treatment

    Talk with the doctor about the best treatment plan for your child. Treatment options include: