Anal Fissure

An anal fissure is a cut or tear in the lining of the anus. The anus is the opening through which stool leaves the body. Tears generally occur just inside the opening.

  • Causes

    The exact cause of an anal fissure is unknown. In most cases, tearing is the result of trauma to the anal lining. Trauma can be caused by:

    • A large, dry, or hard stool
    • Frequent diarrhea
    • Tightened anal sphincter, a group of muscles that open and close the anus
    • Childbirth
    • Anal irritation

  • Definition

    An anal fissure is a cut or tear in the lining of the anus. The anus is the opening through which stool leaves the body. Tears generally occur just inside the opening.

    Anal Fissure
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  • Diagnosis


    The doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done. Anal fissures are generally visible, so diagnosis can be made with an anal exam. If it is not visible, but suspected, your doctor may need to do other tests as long as it is not too painful. These tests include:

    • Digital rectal exam—to feel for any lumps or abnormalities
    • Anoscopy—examination of the anal canal with a scope

    Fissures usually occur in predictable locations around the anus. If there are multiple cuts, or a cut in an unusual location, the doctor may order additional tests to look for other conditions.

  • Prevention


    To help reduce the chances of developing an anal fissure, take these steps:

    • Drinky plent of fluids throughout the day
    • Exercise regularly

    • Eat foods
      high in fiber, such as fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains
    • Avoid straining during bowel movements
    • Follow your treatment plan if you have Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis

  • Risk Factors

    Factors that may increase your chance of developing an anal fissure include:

    • Constipation
    • Straining to pass a bowel movement
    • Prior anal surgery, which can cause scarring and decrease the tissue's elasticity
    • Chronic
      diarrhea
    • Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis
    • Receptive anal intercourse

  • Symptoms

    Anal fissure may cause:

    • Pain during and after a bowel movement
    • Burning sensation during a bowel movement
    • Bleeding with bowel movements that result in bright red blood either on the toilet tissue or in the bowl
    • Small amounts of mucous may be present

    Apprehension about bowel movement pain may cause you to delay bowel movements. This can make the symptom worse.

  • Treatment

    Treatment aims to heal the cut and prevent future anal problems. Most fissures heal on their own or with self-care. Fissures that are fairly new are easier to heal than ones that have persisted for longer than three months.

    Treatments include: