Detached Retina

A detached retina occurs when the retina is pulled or falls away from its normal position. The retina is a light-sensitive layer of tissue that lines the back of the eye. It converts visual images into nerve impulses in the brain that allow us to see.

  • Causes


    Many factors can cause retinal detachment. These include:


    • Eye trauma—damage from blunt or penetrating injuries to the eye, which may be caused by:

      • Sports-related activities
      • Blunt trauma
      • Flying objects
      • Car accidents
    • Fluid getting into the sub-retinal space through a retinal break

    Detached Retina
    Detached Retin
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  • Definition

    A detached retina occurs when the retina is pulled or falls away from its normal position. The retina is a light-sensitive layer of tissue that lines the back of the eye. It converts visual images into nerve impulses in the brain that allow us to see.

  • Diagnosis

    The doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history. An eye exam will be done with your eyes dilated. A special instrument called a slit-lamp will be used.

    Your eye may be examined using ultrasound.

  • Prevention

    To help prevent retinal detachment, do the following:


    • Always wear protective eyewear or goggles when participating in:

      • Contact sports
      • Activities that involve flying objects
      • Any other potentially dangerous activity where the eye can get injured
    • Have regular eye exams at least once a year if you are at risk. Depending on your age and risk factors, you may need to see the eye doctor more often.

    • Contact an eye doctor immediately if you have:

      • An eye injury
      • Any symptoms of retinal detachment, such as flashing lights, floating objects, loss of part of your peripheral vision, or any other change in vision

  • Risk Factors

    Factors that may increase your chances of getting retinal detachment include:

    • Increased age
    • Previous retinal detachment
    • Family members with retinal detachment
    • Severe nearsightedness
    • Holes or tears in the retina
    • Trauma
    • Cataract surgery and other types of eye surgery
    • Scar tissue in the eye, especially if it contracts
    • Tumors in the eye
    • Premature birth
    • Certain other eye and medical disorders involving inflammation, infection or vascular disorders such as:
      • Diabetes
      • Severe acute high blood pressure
      • Inflammatory and autoimmune diseases
      • Blood vessel diseases

  • Symptoms

    Retinal detachment is painless. However, if it is not treated quickly, a detached retina can cause permanent, partial, or total vision loss. If you have any of these symptoms, contact an eye doctor right away:

    • Sudden appearance or increase in the number of floaters, which are shapes that float in the eye and are seen in the field of vision
    • Brief flashes of light in the eye
    • Loss of the eye’s central or peripheral field of vision
    • A curtain appears to fall over part of the visual field
    • Sudden changes or blurring of vision

  • Treatment

    Treatments may include:


    If you are diagnosed with a detached retina, follow your doctor's
    instructions
    .