Orlando Regional Medical Center Receives National Recognition for Cardiac Care

Learn what ORMC is doing for the fight against heart disease.

MEDIA CONTACT

Sabrina Childress
321.841.8748
sabrina.childress@orlandohealth.com

ORLANDO, Fla. (June 27, 2013) - Orlando Regional Medical Center (ORMC) is the second hospital with a Level One Trauma Center in the nation and the first in the state to receive three credentials offered by the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care, an international not-for-profit organization that focuses on transforming cardiovascular care. The credentials — Chest Pain Center Accreditation with PCI, Heart Failure Accreditation and Atrial Fibrillation Certification — reflects the hospital’s excellence in fighting heart disease, the nation’s No. 1 killer.

ORMC is part of the Orlando Health Heart Institute’s the new approach to patient care that provides greater accessibility to clinical experts, and a more personalized, coordinated, and efficient cardiac care experience.  
 
"We opened the Heart Institute in 2011 with an objective to redefine heart care in our community,” said Arnold Einhorn, MD, co-medical director, Orlando Health Heart Institute. “National recognition by an international organization is an honor and a testament to quality outcomes for our patient and improved lives in our community. We are amazed at the continued hard work, dedication and commitment of our team to ensure our community has the best options to treat heart disease."

Though significant progress has been made, heart disease remains the nation’s No. 1 killer and a major health threat.  

 “Atrial fibrillation, heart failure and chest pain are significant conditions on the heart disease spectrum," said Mark Steiner, MD, co-medical director, Orlando Health Heart Institute. “There are nearly three million people living with atrial fibrillation and five million with heart failure. Chest pain alone is the leading cause of Emergency Department visits across the country – with five million visiting for the complaint each year."

SCPC’s goal is to help facilities evaluate and manage patients more effectively, improve patient outcomes, and educate patients and healthcare providers to more efficiently care for heart disease.

“One of the essential requirements for credentials is to demonstrate the integration between our Emergency Department and Emergency Medical Services in the care of cardiovascular patients,” said Janette Sendin, MSN, CNS, CCNS, PCCN, clinical nurse specialist, Cardiology Service Line. “Our expertise and experience as a Level One Trauma hospital adds another critical dimension to our capability to handle more complex cardiovascular patient issues.”
ORMC has shown expertise and commitment to quality patient care by meeting or exceeding a wide set of stringent criteria and undergoing a comprehensive review by an accreditation review specialist from the SCPC.

Key areas for Atrial Fibrillation Certification:

  • Emergency Department Integration with Emergency Medical Services
  • Treatment for Patients Presenting in Atrial Fibrillation, Observation Services, or Inpatient Stay
  • Atrial Fibrillation Discharge Criteria from the Emergency Department, Observation Services, or Inpatient Stay
  • Atrial Fibrillation Patient Education in the Emergency Department, Observation Services, and Inpatient Unit
  • Atrial Fibrillation Community Outreach

Key areas for Heart Failure Accreditation:
  • Emergency Department Integration with Emergency Medical Services
  • Treatment for Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department in Heart Failure
  • Heart Failure Discharge Criteria from the Emergency Department, Observation Stay or Inpatient Stay
  • Heart Failure Patient Education in the Emergency Department, Observation and Inpatient Unit

Key criteria for Chest Pain Center Accreditation with PCI (percutaneous coronary intervention):
  • Reducing the time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis and treatment
  • Treating patients more quickly during the critical window of time when the integrity of the heart muscle can be preserved
  • Monitoring patients when it is not certain that they are having a heart attack to ensure that they are not sent home too quickly or needlessly admitted to the hospital


July 02, 2013, in Health