Appendicostomy

An appendicostomy is the creation of a pathway from your belly button to the large intestine. The pathway is created using your own body tissue, the appendix. Using your own body tissue instead of an artificial tube will decrease the chance of irritation. There is also no external sign of the new pathway.

  • Call Your Doctor

    Call your doctor if any of these occurs:

    • Have trouble using the tube
    • Tube falls out before healing time is done
    • Pain that is not controlled with medication
    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or any discharge from the incision site
    • Abdominal pain
    • Trouble passing enema through tube

    If you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    An appendicostomy is the creation of a pathway from your belly button to the large intestine. The pathway is created using your own body tissue, the appendix. Using your own body tissue instead of an artificial tube will decrease the chance of irritation. There is also no external sign of the new pathway.

    Appendix
    Appendix
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  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    An appendicostomy is done to help deliver enemas ore easily. Enemas are fluids that are placed into the large intestines to soften stool and relieve constipation. The fluids help clean out the intestines when there is a problem with the intestines or stool. Enemas may be needed in children with Spina bifida, spinal injuries, Hirschprung’s disease, or constipation not relieved by medical care.

    Enemas are normally given through the rectum. This can make it difficult for people to deliver the enemas to themselves. For older children, it can be difficult to have rectal enemas delivered by their parents. An appendicostomy can allow more independence for these children.

  • Possible Complications

    Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your doctor will talk to you about problems that could occur, like:

    • Excess bleeding
    • Adverse reaction to anesthesia such as light-headedness, low blood pressure, or wheezing
    • Infection
    • Leakage of tube or appendix
    • Narrowed or blocked tube that requires a second surgery to fix it

    Talk to your doctor about these risks before the procedure.