Arteriogram

An arteriogram is a test that allows a doctor to see the arteries on an x-ray. A contrast dye is injected into the arteries to make them visible. The test makes images that can be used to diagnose and treat problems in the arteries.

  • Call Your Doctor

    Call your doctor if any of these occurs:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or any discharge from the injection site
    • Extreme sweating, nausea, or vomiting
    • Extreme pain, including chest pain
    • Leg or arm feels cold, turns white or blue, or becomes numb or tingly
    • Difficulty breathing
    • Any problems with your speech or vision
    • Facial weakness

    If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition


    An arteriogram is a test that allows a doctor to see the arteries on an
    x-ray. A contrast dye is injected into the arteries to make them visible. The test makes images that can be used to diagnose and treat problems in the arteries.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Test

    An arteriogram is done to check the arteries for narrowing, bulging, or blockages. These could be signs of disease.

    Plaque Blocking an Artery
    IMAGE
    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

    This test could be done to diagnose conditions such as:

    • Peripheral arterial disease
      (PAD)—blockages in the arteries in your arms or legs
    • Aneurysm—bulging of the arteries
    • Vascular malformation—problems in the structure of the arteries


    Sometimes, the doctor may treat problems found during the arteriogram. The doctor may dissolve a clot or do
    angioplasty
    with or without stenting.

  • Possible Complications

    Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your doctor will review potential problems, like:

    • Bruising or infection at the puncture site
    • Bleeding, pain, or swelling where the catheter was inserted
    • Allergic reaction to the contrast dye
    • Damage to the blood vessels during the procedure, which may require surgery
    • Heart attack,
      stroke, or in rare cases, death