Cholecystectomy -- Open Surgery

Cholecystectomy is the surgical removal of the gallbladder. The gallbladder is near the liver. It stores bile that is made by the liver. Bile helps in the digestion of fatty foods. The gallbladder releases bile into a system of ducts that lead to the small intestine. The open version of this surgery is done when a less invasive version called laparoscopic surgery cannot be done.

  • Call Your Doctor

    After you leave the hospital, contact your doctor if any of the following occur:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge at the incision site
    • Cough, shortness of breath, chest pain
    • Increased abdominal pain
    • Pain that you cannot control with the medications you have been given
    • Blood in the stool
    • Nausea and/or vomiting that you cannot control with the medications you were given after surgery, or which last for more than two days after you leave the hospital
    • Bloating and gas that last for more than a month
    • Pain and/or swelling in your feet, calves, or legs
    • Dark urine, light stools, or yellowing of the skin or eyes

    In case of an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    Cholecystectomy is the surgical removal of the gallbladder. The gallbladder is near the liver. It stores bile that is made by the liver. Bile helps in the digestion of fatty foods. The gallbladder releases bile into a system of ducts that lead to the small intestine.


    The open version of this surgery is done when a less invasive version called
    laparoscopic surgery
    cannot be done.

    Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy vs. Open Cholecystectomy
    IMAGE
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  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure


    This surgery is used to remove a diseased or damaged gallbladder. The damage is typically caused by infection or inflammation.
    This is often due to
    gallstones,
    which are crystals of bile that can form in the gallbladder. Sometimes, these get stuck in the ducts that bile normally flows through. This blockage in the ducts can damage the gallbladder and the liver.

  • Possible Complications

    Complications are rare, but no procedure is completely free of risk. If you are planning to have a cholecystectomy, your doctor will review a list of possible complications, which may include:

    • Gallstones that have entered the abdominal cavity
    • Bleeding
    • Infection
    • Injury to other nearby structures or organs
    • Reactions to general anesthesia
    • Blood clots

    Some factors that may increase the risk of complications include:

    • Increased age
    • Pregnancy
    • Obesity
    • Smoking
    • Malnutrition
    • Recent or chronic illness
    • Diabetes
    • Heart or lung problems
    • Bleeding disorders
    • Alcoholism
      and illegal drugs
    • Use of certain medicines