Colon Polypectomy

A colon polypectomy is the removal of polyps from the inside lining of the colon, also called the large intestine. A polyp is a mass of tissue. Some types of polyps can develop into cancer. Most polyps can be removed during a colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy.

  • Call Your Doctor

    After arriving home, contact your doctor if any of the following occurs:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge from the rectum—up to ½ cup per day of blood can be expected for up to 3-4 days following polypectomy
    • Black, tarry stools
    • Severe abdominal pain
    • Hard, swollen abdomen
    • Inability to pass gas or stool
    • Cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, or severe nausea or vomiting
    • New, unexplained symptoms

    In case of an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition


    A colon polypectomy is the removal of
    polyps
    from the inside lining of the colon, also called the large intestine. A polyp is a mass of tissue. Some types of polyps can develop into cancer. Most polyps can be removed during a
    colonoscopy
    or
    sigmoidoscopy.

    A Colon Polyp
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  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure


    The purpose of the surgery is to remove a polyp. It is done to prevent
    cancer.

    In rare cases, larger polyps can cause troublesome symptoms, such as rectal bleeding, abdominal pain, and bowel irregularities. A polyp removal will relieve these symptoms.

  • Possible Complications

    Complications are rare, but no procedure is completely free of risk. If you are planning to have a polypectomy, your doctor will review a list of possible complications, which may include:

    • Damage to the colon wall
    • Bleeding
    • Infection
    • Adverse reaction to the sedative

    Factors that may increase the risk of complications include:

    • Smoking
    • Type, size, and location of the polyp

    • Patient factors, such as blood-clotting disorders, substance abuse, or other diseases like
      obesity
      and
      diabetes