Colorectal Resection

A colorectal resection is a surgery to remove a section of the large intestine, also called the colon. It is done to remove injured or diseased parts of the colon.

  • Call Your Doctor

    Call your doctor if any of the following occurs:

    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, warmth, drainage, or bulging at the incision site
    • Nausea and/or vomiting that you cannot control with the medications you were given after surgery
    • Severe abdominal pain
    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain
    • Pain and/or swelling in your feet, calves, or legs
    • Pain, burning, urgency, frequency of urination, or persistent bleeding in the urine
    • Not passing any stool
    • Blood in your stool, or black, tarry stools
    • Diarrhea
    • Feeling weak or lightheaded

    If you had a colostomy created, call your doctor if any of the following occurs:

    • Not collecting stool in the ostomy pouch
    • The skin around the stoma appears irritated, moist, red, swollen, or develops sores

    If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    A colorectal resection is a surgery to remove a section of the large intestine, also called the colon. It is done to remove injured or diseased parts of the colon.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure


    This surgery is performed to treat a variety of conditions, including the following:

    • Colorectal cancer
    • Diverticular disease—small pouches form in the wall of the colon

    • Inflammatory intestinal diseases, such as
      colitis,
      Crohns disease
    • Intestinal blockage
    • Trauma to the intestine
    • Precancerous polyps, especially those seen in familial polyposis
    • A hole in the wall of the colon, or a dead piece of intestine
    • Bleeding from the colon

    For colon cancer, the goal is to remove all of the cancer. If you have a precancerous condition, then you may have prevented the development of cancer. If you had surgery due to other conditions, a successful operation will alleviate or improve your symptoms.

  • Possible Complications

    Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your doctor will review potential problems, like:

    • Damage to other organs or structures
    • Infection
    • Bleeding
    • Hernia
      forming
      at the incision site
    • Blood clots
    • Complications from general anesthesia
    • Intestinal obstruction due to development of scar tissue


    Some factors that may increase the risk of complications include:

    • Smoking
    • Having neurological, heart, or lung conditions
    • Age older than 70 years
    • Obesity
    • Previous abdominal surgery or radiation therapy
    • Infection