Corneal Transplant

Corneal transplant is a surgical procedure used to replace a portion of a diseased or damaged cornea with a healthy one. The cornea is the clear, outer surface on the front of the eye. Cornea of the EyeCopyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • Call Your Doctor

    Call your doctor if any of these occur:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Vision symptoms, including decreased vision, floaters, flashing lights, increased light sensitivity, or loss of peripheral vision
    • Increased eye redness
    • Increased pain
    • Persistent nausea or vomiting

    If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    Corneal transplant is a surgical procedure used to replace a portion of a diseased or damaged cornea with a healthy one.

    The cornea is the clear, outer surface on the front of the eye.

    Cornea of the Eye
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    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    A corneal transplant can correct vision problems caused by infections, injuries, or medical conditions that effect the cornea. It is often recommended for the following:

    • Keratoconus—a thinning and bulging of the cornea that causes blurred vision
    • A cornea scarred from infection or injury
    • Clouding of the cornea
    • Complications of previous eye surgery

  • Possible Complications

    The procedure is highly successful. Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your doctor will review potential problems, like:

    • Rejection of the new cornea—The body’s defense system attacks the new tissue, damaging it.
    • Glaucoma
    • Problems focusing

    • Swelling or
      detachment of the retina
    • Cataract
    • Infection
    • Bleeding

    Before your procedure, talk to your doctor about ways to manage factors that may increase your risk of complications such as:

    • Smoking
    • Drinking
    • Chronic diseases, such as diabetes or obesity

    The operation is most successful for patients who have the following:

    • Keratoconus
    • Corneal scars

    It is less successful for those who have corneal infection
    and severe injury, like a chemical burn.