Coronary Stenting

In coronary stenting, a mesh, metal tube is placed in an artery in the heart. The tube is called a stent. It helps to keep the artery open. It is placed after an artery has been cleared of blockage during an angioplasty . There are two types of stents. One is called a drug-eluting stent. It is coated with a medication that is slowly released. The medication helps decrease the rate of reblockage in the artery. The other type of stent is called a bare-metal stent. It does not contain any medication. Your doctor will discuss which stent option is best for you.

  • Call for Medical Help Right Away If Any of the Following Occurs

    Call for medical help right away if you have symptoms including:

    • Drooping facial muscles
    • Changes in vision or speech
    • Difficulty walking or using your arms
    • Change in sensation to affected leg or arm, including numbness, feeling cold, or change in color
    • Extreme sweating, nausea or vomiting
    • Lightheadedness
    • Chest pain
    • Rapid, irregular heartbeat
    • Cough, shortness of breath, or difficulty breathing
    • Weakness or fainting

    If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Call Your Doctor If Any of the Following Occurs

    Monitor your recovery after you leave the hospital. Call your doctor if any of these occur:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or any discharge from the catheter insertion site

  • Definition


    In coronary stenting, a mesh, metal tube is placed in an artery in the heart. The tube is called a stent. It helps to keep the artery open. It is placed after an artery has been cleared of blockage during an
    angioplasty
    .

    There are two types of stents. One is called a drug-eluting stent. It is coated with a medication that is slowly released. The medication helps decrease the rate of reblockage in the artery. The other type of stent is called a bare-metal stent. It does not contain any medication. Your doctor will discuss which stent option is best for you.

    Coronary Artery: Stent Procedure
    nucleus factsheet image
    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    This procedure is done to hold open a previously blocked artery in the heart. This will allow more normal blood flow through that artery.

    After the stenting, your artery should be more open. This will allow better blood flow to feed the heart muscle. It may mean that you will no longer have chest pain. Your tolerance for exercise may increase.

  • Possible Complications

    If you are planning to have a stent, your doctor will review a list of possible complications. These may include:

    • Bleeding at the point of the catheter insertion
    • Damage to the walls of arteries, causing you to need additional procedures or surgery
    • Heart attack
      ,
      or
      abnormal heart beats known as
      arrhythmia
    • Allergic reaction to x-ray dye
    • Blood clot formation
    • Infection
    • Stroke


    Sometimes the procedure is not successful or the artery narrows again. You may require repeat angioplasty or
    coronary artery bypass grafting
    (CABG).

    Factors that may increase the risk of complications include:

    • Allergies
      to medications, shellfish, or x-ray dye
    • Obesity
    • Smoking
    • Bleeding disorder
    • Increased age

    • Recent
      pneumonia

    • Recent
      heart attack
    • Diabetes
    • Kidney disease