Cystocele and Rectocele Repair

A cystocele occurs when part of the bladder wall bulges into the vagina. The bulge happens through a defect in the wall between the bladder and vagina. A rectocele occurs when part of the wall of the rectum bulges into the vagina. The bulge happens through a defect in the wall between the rectum and vagina. These form because of a problem with the fascia, ligaments, and muscles of the pelvis.

  • Call Your Doctor

    After you leave the hospital, contact your doctor if any of the following occur:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Excessive bleeding or any discharge from the incision site
    • Unusually heavy vaginal bleeding, or foul-smelling discharge from the vagina
    • Nausea or vomiting
    • Pain that you cannot control with the medications you have been given
    • Inability to pass urine into the catheter
    • Pain, burning, urgency or frequency of urination, or persistent blood in the urine
    • Cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain

    In case of an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition


    A
    cystocele
    occurs when part of the bladder wall bulges into the vagina. The bulge happens through a defect in the wall between the bladder and vagina.

    Cystocele
    si55551974 96472 1
    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.


    A
    rectocele
    occurs when part of the wall of the rectum bulges into the vagina. The bulge happens through a defect in the wall between the rectum and vagina.

    Rectocele
    si55551976 96472 1
    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

    These form because of a problem with the fascia, ligaments, and muscles of the pelvis.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    Cystocele and rectocele can cause problems going to the bathroom such as frequent urination, urine leakage, and difficulty urinating. Pain during sex may also occur. This surgery is done to help relieve these symptoms.

    Most often, this type of surgery is not done until all other treatments have been tried. Other treatments may include muscle exercises and the insertion of a supportive device called a pessary. If you have tried these treatments and have had no relief, your doctor may suggest surgical repair.

  • Possible Complications

    Complications are rare, but no procedure is completely free of risk. If you are planning to have this type of repair, your doctor will review a list of possible complications, which may include:

    • Reaction to anesthesia
    • Infection
    • Bleeding
    • Accidental damage to vagina, rectum, and bladder
    • Accidental damage to nearby organs
    • Difficulty with bowel movements

    Before your procedure, talk to your doctor about ways to manage factors that may increase your risk of complications such as:

    • Smoking
    • Drinking
    • Chronic disease such as diabetes or obesity

    Prior pelvic surgery may increase the risk of complications.