Endometrial Ablation

This procedure involves the surgical removal of the lining of the uterus (womb). It may involve using heat, cold temperatures, microwave energy, or other methods.

  • Call Your Doctor


    After you leave the hospital, call your doctor if any of the following occurs:


    • Heavy vaginal bleeding
    • Severe abdominal cramping and pelvic pain
    • Severe pain during sex
    • Severe low back pain
    • Pain during bowel movements or urination
    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Cough, chest pain, or shortness of breath
    • Dizziness or lightheadedness
    • Pain or tenderness in the calf or leg
    • Menstruation does not get lighter after 2-3 periods

    In case of an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    This procedure involves the surgical removal of the lining of the uterus (womb). It may involve using heat, cold temperatures, microwave energy, or other methods.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure


    Endometrial ablation will likely make menstrual flow lighter. In some cases, it stops menstrual flow completely. The procedure is used to treat
    menorrhagia
    (recurrent heavy periods not controlled by medicine).

    Talk to your doctor about your plans for having a baby. This procedure decreases your chance of pregnancy.

  • Possible Complications


    Complications are rare, but no procedure is completely free of risk. If you are planning to have endometrial ablation, your doctor will review a list of possible complications, which may include:

    • Infection
    • Bleeding
    • Complications related to anesthesia
    • Uterine perforation or organ injury
    • Edema (swelling) due to fluid leakage and absorption
    • Thermal (heat) injury to the vagina, vulva, or bowel

    Before your procedure, talk to your doctor about ways to manage factors that may increase your risk of complications such as:

    • Smoking
    • Drinking
    • Chronic disease such as diabetes or obesity


    The following may also increase your risk of complications:

    • Pregnancy or possible pregnancy—procedure should not be done if there is a chance that you are pregnant

    • History of
      pelvic inflammatory disease
      (PID)—may trigger a recurrence of PID
    • Inflammation of the cervix