Fundoplication -- Laparoscopic Surgery

Fundoplication is surgery to wrap upper stomach around the lower esophagus. It reduces the amount of acid that enters the esophagus from the stomach. Laparoscopic procedures use small incisions rather than the large incisions that are used during open surgery.

  • Call Your Doctor


    Call your doctor if any of these occur:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or any discharge from the incision site
    • Nausea and/or vomiting that you cannot control with the medications you were given after surgery, or which persist for more than two days after discharge from the hospital
    • Increased swelling or pain in the abdomen
    • Difficulty swallowing that does not improve
    • Pain that you cannot control with the medications you have been given
    • Pain, burning, urgency or frequency of urination, or persistent bleeding in the urine
    • Cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain
    • Any other new symptoms

    If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition



    Fundoplication is surgery to wrap upper stomach around the lower esophagus. It reduces the amount of acid that enters the esophagus from the stomach. Laparoscopic procedures use small incisions rather than the large incisions that are used during open surgery.

    Fundoplication
    Fundoplication
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  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure


    The surgery is most often done for the following reasons:

    • Eliminate gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms that are not relieved by medication

    • Reduce acid reflux that is contributing to
      asthma
      symptoms
    • Repair a hiatal hernia, which may be responsible for making GERD symptoms worse
    • Reduce of serious, long-term complications resulting from too much acid in the esophagus

  • Possible Complications

    Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your doctor will review potential problems, like:

    • Anesthesia-related problems
    • Infection
    • Bleeding
    • Difficulty swallowing
    • Return of reflux symptoms
    • Limited ability to burp or vomit
    • Gas pains
    • Damage to other organs

    In rare cases, the procedure may need to be repeated. This may happen if the wrap was too tight, the wrap slips, or if a new hernia forms.

    Before your procedure, talk to your doctor about ways to manage factors that may increase your risk of complications, such as:

    • Smoking
    • Drinking
    • Chronic diseases, such as diabetes or obesity