Hip Osteotomy

The hip is made of a bowl shape socket on the pelvis and a ball at the top of the leg bone. A hip osteotomy is a surgery to cut, reshape, and reposition the bones of the pelvis or legs.

  • Call Your Doctor

    After your child leaves the hospital, contact the doctor if your child has:

    • Signs of infection such as fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge around incision site
    • Increased pain or swelling
    • Cough, shortness of breath, chest pain
    • Severe nausea or vomiting
    • Numbness, tingling, or loss of feeling in your leg, knee, or foot

    In case of an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    The hip is made of a bowl shape socket on the pelvis and a ball at the top of the leg bone. A hip osteotomy is a surgery to cut, reshape, and reposition the bones of the pelvis or legs.

    The Hip Joint
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  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    Hip osteotomy is done when the hip bones do not fit together well. Poorly fitting hip bones can cause pain and make it difficult to move. Over a long period of time the improper fit can lead to problems like arthritis.

    The surgery is most often done in children. It may be done because of:


    • Conditions that cause abnormal muscle contractions such as
      cerebral palsy

    • Hip bones do not form correctly such as in
      developmental dysplasia of the hip
    • Other injuries or illnesses of the hip such as Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

  • Possible Complications

    Complications are rare. But no procedure is completely free of risk. If your child is having an osteotomy, the doctor will review a list of possible complications, including:

    • Incomplete healing of the bone
    • Shortening of the leg
    • Bleeding
    • Ball cannot be fit into the socket
    • Infection
    • Reaction to anesthesia
    • Blood clots
    • Injuries to nerves or blood vessels
    • Nausea and vomiting

    Before your procedure, talk to your doctor about ways to manage factors that may increase your risk of complications such as:

    • Exposure to Smoke
    • Chronic disease such as diabetes or asthma