Hip Replacement

A total hip replacement is a surgery to replace a diseased or injured hip joint. An artificial ball-and-socket joint is inserted to make a new hip. It can be done by full open surgery or a minimally invasive technique. The minimally invasive technique only requires one or two tiny incisions and special instruments. People eligible for this surgery are typically:

  • Call Your Doctor

    After you leave the hospital, contact your doctor if any of the following occur:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge around incision site
    • Pain and/or swelling in the feet, calves, or legs
    • Cough, shortness of breath, chest pain
    • Severe nausea or vomiting
    • Hip pain that you cannot control with the medicines you have been given or that becomes worse
    • Numbness, tingling, or loss of feeling in your leg, knee, or foot

    In case of an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    A
    total hip replacement
    is a surgery to replace a diseased or injured hip joint. An artificial ball-and-socket joint is inserted to make a new hip. It can be done by full open surgery or a minimally invasive technique.

    The minimally invasive technique only requires one or two tiny incisions and special instruments. People eligible for this surgery are typically:

    • Younger than 50
    • Of normal weight
    • Healthier than those who have the traditional total hip replacement surgery
    Left Total Hip Replacement
    Hip Replacement
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  • What to Expect

    Placement of Prosthesis
    hip replacement hardware
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  • Reasons for Procedure

    This surgery is done when pain and stiffness limit your normal activities and rest, medicine, and physical therapy are no longer working.

    Other reasons for surgery may include a broken hip, severe rheumatoid arthritis, bone tumors, and loss of blood supply to the bones of the hip.

  • Possible Complications

    If you are planning to have a hip replacement, your doctor will review a list of possible complications, which may include:

    • Hip dislocation, which is the most common complication—occurs when the ball portion of the prosthesis dislocates from its normal position in the hip
    • Infection
    • Blood clots
    • Swelling or bleeding
    • Injury to nearby nerves or blood vessels
    • Anesthesia-related problems, like pneumonia
    • Noisy or squeaky hip after surgery

    Factors that may increase the risk of complications include:

    • Pre-existing medical condition, such as heart or lung problems
    • Obesity

    • Infection, such as
      urinary tract infection
      or
      gum disease—having an infection increases the risk of bacteria entering the bloodstream and infecting the joint.
    • Previous problems with blood clots
    • Smoking

    Be sure to discuss these risks with your doctor before the surgery.