Hysteroscopy

This procedure uses a hysteroscope to view the inside of a woman’s uterus (womb). A hysteroscope is a long, thin telescope with a camera on the end. Other small, surgical tools may also be inserted into the uterus through the hysteroscope. Female Reproductive OrgansCopyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • Call Your Doctor

    After arriving home, contact your doctor if any of the following occurs:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Abnormal bleeding (more than a menstrual period)
    • Foul-smelling vaginal discharge
    • Abdominal pain
    • Nausea, vomiting
    • Cough, shortness of breath, difficulty swallowing, or chest pain
    • Trouble urinating
    • Any other concerns

    In case of an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    This procedure uses a hysteroscope to view the inside of a woman’s uterus (womb). A hysteroscope is a long, thin telescope with a camera on the end. Other small, surgical tools may also be inserted into the uterus through the hysteroscope.

    Female Reproductive Organs
    Nucleus Image
    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    Hysteroscopy is done for:


    • Diagnostic reasons—to examine the inner uterus to identify problems or abnormalities; may be done if you have:


      • Repeated
        miscarriages
      • Infertility

      • An abnormal
        Pap test
      • Abnormal or postmenopausal uterine bleeding

    • Therapeutic reasons—to correct anatomic problems and defects in the uterus; may be done for:

      • Endometrial ablation—removal of uterine lining from the uterus
      • Myomectomy—removal of fibrous or muscular tissue (fibroids)
      • Removal of polyps (usually noncancerous)
      • Removal of intrauterine devices (IUDs)

    The result of the hysteroscopy depends on the reason for the procedure. In some cases, the doctor may be able to treat a condition right away. In other cases, you may need further surgery or other treatment.

  • Possible Complications

    Complications are rare. But, no procedure is completely free of risk. If you are planning to have hysteroscopy, your doctor will review a list of possible complications. These may include:

    • Swelling or bleeding
    • Infection
    • Organ injury
    • Reaction to anesthesia

    Before your procedure, talk to your doctor about ways to manage factors that may increase your risk of complications such as:

    • Smoking
    • Drinking
    • Chronic disease such as diabetes or obesity

    The following may also increase the risk of complications:


    • History of
      pelvic inflammatory disease
    • Inflammation of the cervix
    • Distended bladder
    • Pregnancy or possible pregnancy