Intrauterine Device Removal

An intrauterine device (IUD) is a type of temporary birth control for women. The device is usually used to prevent pregnancy. The hormone-releasing device may be used for other reasons. It is inserted into the uterus though the vagina by a doctor. The uterus carries the fetus during pregnancy. A woman with an IUD may decide to have it removed. IUD removal is done by a doctor. You should never remove an IUD yourself.

  • Call Your Doctor

    After arriving home, contact your doctor if any of the following occurs:

    • Severe cramps, pain, or tenderness in your abdomen
    • Fever or chills
    • Unexplained vaginal bleeding or unusual discharge from your vagina

  • Definition


    An intrauterine device (IUD) is a type of temporary birth control for women. The device is usually used to prevent pregnancy. The hormone-releasing device may be used for other reasons. It is
    inserted
    into the uterus though the vagina by a doctor. The uterus carries the fetus during pregnancy.

    A woman with an IUD may decide to have it removed. IUD removal is done by a doctor. You should never remove an IUD yourself.

    Intrauterine Device
    IMAGE
    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    There are two types of IUDs: hormone-releasing devices and copper devices.

    The hormone-releasing IUD can be left in the body for 5 years before needing replacement. The copper IUD can be left in the body for 10 years. An IUD should be removed and/or replaced once it has expired.

    Other reasons to remove an IUD may include:

    • You get a sexually transmitted infection
    • Side effects (eg, abnormal bleeding, pain)

    • Heavy and/or prolonged
      menstrual bleeding
    • IUD fails and you become pregnant
    • You want to use a different birth control method
    • You want to become pregnant

    • Your menstrual periods have ended due to
      menopause
    • You need treatment that requires the IUD to be removed

  • Possible Complications

    Complications are rare, but no procedure is completely free of risk. If you are planning to have your IUD removed, be aware that cramping and bleeding may occur during the removal process. However, this is normal. Some women may experience fainting or near-fainting just after the procedure.

    An IUD can be removed at any time, but it may be easier during a woman’s menstrual period, since the cervix (opening of the uterus) is softer. Once the IUD is removed, a woman is able to become pregnant again.

    Note
    : If you have the IUD removed during the middle of your menstrual cycle and you had sex during the week before removal, you may be at risk of being pregnant.