Knee Osteotomy

A knee osteotomy is the removal of a wedge of bone from the tibia to reshape and realign the leg. The tibia is the shinbone. Recovery time will depend on certain factors, such as your overall health.

  • Call Your Doctor

    Call your doctor if any of the following occurs:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge from the incision site
    • Swelling, redness, or pain in your legs, calves, or feet
    • Pain that you cannot control with the medications you have been given
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • Cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain
    • Your leg, foot, or toes appear chalky white, blue, or black
    • Numbness or tingling in your leg, foot, or toes

    If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    A knee osteotomy is the removal of a wedge of bone from the tibia to reshape and realign the leg. The tibia is the shinbone. Recovery time will depend on certain factors, such as your overall health.

    The Kneecap
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  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure


    This procedure aligns the knee joint so the healthy part of the knee surface is able to do more weight-bearing. This takes pressure off the damaged part. Damage is often due to
    osteoarthritis
    . This surgery may be done instead of a
    total knee replacement.
    It may also be done to correct poor knee alignment for other reasons.

    While osteotomy does not cure conditions like osteoarthritis, the surgery may:

    • Reduce pain
    • Improve movement
    • Delay further damage to the joint
    • Postpone the need for total knee replacement surgery

  • Possible Complications

    Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your doctor will review potential problems, like:

    • Infection
    • Poor healing of the bone
    • Excess bleeding
    • Swelling
    • Blood clots
    • Shortening of the leg
    • Injuries to nerves or blood vessels

    Before your procedure, talk to your doctor about ways to manage factors that may increase your risk of complications such as:

    • Smoking
    • Drinking
    • Chronic disease such as diabetes or obesity
    • Poor nutrition
    • The use of certain medications

    Your risk of complications may be increased if you have a history of blood clots.