Microvascular Occlusion

Microvascular occlusion clamps off the artery leading to an aneurysm. This prevents bleeding and rupture. Sometimes a bypass procedure is done as well, rerouting blood vessels to healthy areas of the brain. A portion of the skull is removed (called a craniotomy) and restored during this complex, open surgery.

  • Call Your Doctor

    It is important for you to monitor your recovery after you leave the hospital. Alert your doctor to any problems right away. If any of the following occur, call your doctor:

    • Any changes in physical ability, such as balance, strength, or movement
    • Any changes to mental status, such as consciousness, memory, or thinking
    • Weakness, numbness, tingling
    • Signs of infection including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, bleeding, or discharge from the incision site
    • Headache
    • Changes in vision
    • Fainting
    • Pain that you cannot control with the medications you were given
    • Persistent nausea or vomiting
    • Trouble controlling your bladder and/or bowels
    • Pain, swelling, or cramping in your legs

    Call for emergency medical services right away if any of the following occurs: 

    • Seizure
    • Shortness of breath or chest pain
    • Loss of consciousness

    If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition


    Microvascular occlusion clamps off the artery leading to an
    aneurysm. This prevents bleeding and rupture. Sometimes a bypass procedure is done as well, rerouting blood vessels to healthy areas of the brain. A portion of the skull is removed (called a
    craniotomy) and restored during this complex, open surgery.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    Microvascular occlusion often treats a brain aneurysm that has ruptured and caused damage to the artery. It will not fix damaged areas of the brain, but it can improve quality of life by stopping bleeding.

    Brain Aneurysm
    IMAGE
    An aneurysm is a weakened blood vessel in the brain that collects blood. The bulging, blood-filled pocket can put pressure on parts of the brain, pressing on nearby nerves. This can cause symptoms or cause the blood vessel to rupture (hemorrhage).
    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • Possible Complications

    Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your doctor will review potential problems, like:

    • Weakness
    • Numbness or tingling
    • Speech disturbances
    • Visual changes
    • Confusion, memory loss
    • Seizures
    • Infection
    • Adverse reaction to anesthesia
    • Kidney damage

    • Blood clots
    • Ruptured aneurysm during surgery


    Factors that may increase the risk of complications include:

    • Smoking
    • Obesity
    • High blood pressure

    Discuss these risks with your doctor before the surgery.