Mitral Valve Replacement

The mitral valve is on the left side of the heart. It allows blood to flow from the left upper chamber into the left lower chamber. When the valve is not working well, it may need to be replaced.

  • Call Your Doctor

    After you leave the hospital, contact your doctor if any of the following occurs:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or any discharge from the incision site
    • Constipation,
      diarrhea, bloody or tarry-color bowel movements, or stomach pain
    • Weight gain—greater than two pounds in two days
    • Worsening of ankle swelling
    • Severe headache
    • Nausea and/or vomiting
    • Cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain
    • Coughing up blood
    • Skin rash, or unusual bruising or bleeding
    • Confusion
    • Lightheadedness when standing
    • Tingling in hands and feet
    • Irregular heartbeat, extremely slow pulse, or fast pulse
    • Redness, swelling, or pain in one or both legs
    • Burning during urination

    In case of an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    The mitral valve is on the left side of the heart. It allows blood to flow from the left upper chamber into the left lower chamber. When the valve is not working well, it may need to be replaced.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    Healthy heart valves allow blood to flow one way. Diseased valves either leak and cause back flow or narrow and restrict flow. The condition can be life threatening. Sometimes the valve can be repaired. Other times, it must be replaced.

    Rheumatic fever, infections, defects at birth, and wear and tear are the most common causes of mitral valve problems.

  • Possible Complications