Open Reduction and Internal Fixation Surgery

An open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) is a type of surgery used to fix broken bones. This is a two-part surgery. First, the broken bone is reduced or put back into place. Next, an internal fixation device is placed on the bone; this can be screws, plates, rods, or pins used to hold the broken bone together.

  • Call Your Doctor

    After you leave the hospital, contact your doctor if any of the following occurs:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain in the affected limb
    • A lot of bleeding or any discharge from the incision site
    • Loss of feeling in the affected limb
    • Swelling or pain in the muscles around the broken bone
    • Pain cannot be controlled with the medications you've been given
    • Cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain
    • Joint pain, fatigue, stiffness, rash, or other new symptoms

    If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition


    An open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) is a type of surgery used to fix broken bones. This is a two-part surgery. First, the broken bone is
    reduced
    or put back into place. Next, an
    internal fixation
    device is placed on the bone; this can be screws, plates, rods, or pins used to hold the broken bone together.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    This surgery is done to repair fractures that would not heal correctly with casting or splinting alone.

  • Possible Complications

    Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your doctor will review potential problems, like:

    • Infection
    • Bleeding
    • Reaction to anesthesia
    • Blood clots

    Before your procedure, talk to your doctor about ways to manage factors that may increase your risk of complications such as:

    • Smoking
    • Drinking
    • Chronic disease such as diabetes or obesity

    Your risk of complications may be increased if you have a history of blood clots.