Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy

Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a procedure that places a tube through the abdominal wall and into the stomach.

  • Call Your Doctor

    After you leave the hospital, contact your doctor if any of the following occurs:

    • Pain that you cannot control with the medications you have been given
    • The tube falls out
    • Problems with the function of the tube or drainage around the tube
    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge from the incision site
    • Headaches, muscle aches, lightheadedness, or general ill feeling

    • Nausea,
      vomiting,
      constipation
      , or abdominal swelling

    In case of an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is a procedure that places a tube through the abdominal wall and into the stomach.

  • What to Expect

    Leading up to your procedure:


    • Talk to your doctor about your medications. You may be asked to stop taking some medications up to one week before the procedure, such as:

      • Anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen
      • Blood thinners
      • Anti-platelet medication
    • Do not have nutrition or fluids for at least eight hours before the procedure.
    • Arrange for a ride to and from the hospital.

  • Reasons for Procedure

    A gastrostomy tube provides an alternative feeding site. It may be needed to:

    • Feed a person who has a hard time sucking or swallowing, or who is otherwise unable to eat
    • Drain the stomach of fluids that have built up

  • Possible Complications

    If you are planning to have a PEG, your doctor will review a list of possible complications, which may include:

    • PEG tube malfunction
    • Aspiration—accidental sucking into the airways of fluid, food, or any foreign material
    • Damage to other organs
    • Inflammation of the lining of the abdomen
    • Infection
    • Bloating
    • Nausea
    • Diarrhea
    • Irritation of the skin near the tube
    • Blockage
    • An abnormal opening called a fistula

    Factors that may increase the risk of complications include:

    • Obesity
      or
      diabetes
    • Smoking
    • Alcohol abuse
      or
      drug use
    • Use of certain prescription medications
    • Prior abdominal surgeries
    • Increased age