Prostate Biopsy

A prostate biopsy is the removal of a small amount of tissue from the prostate gland. The tissue is examined to determine whether there is cancer . Prostate CancerCopyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • Call Your Doctor

    After arriving home, contact your doctor if any of the following occurs:

    • Inability to urinate
    • Blood in the urine more than 2-3 days post-biopsy
    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Pain that you cannot control with the medicines you have been given
    • Pain, burning, urgency, or frequency of urination
    • Cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain
    • Rectal bleeding that lasts more than 2-3 days after the biopsy

    In case of an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition


    A prostate biopsy is the removal of a small amount of tissue from the prostate gland. The tissue is examined to determine whether there is
    cancer
    .

    Prostate Cancer
    Nucleus image
    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    A prostate biopsy is usually done after an abnormal finding by:

    • Digital rectal exam
    • Prostate specific antigen blood test

    A prostate biopsy is the only way to find out if cancer cells are present.

  • Possible Complications

    Complications are rare. But, no procedure is free of risk. If you are planning to have a prostate biopsy, your doctor will review a list of possible complications. These complications may include:

    • Infection
    • Bruising or lengthy bleeding from the rectum or in urine or semen
    • Difficulty urinating
    • Reactions to anesthesia

    Factors that may increase the risk of complications include:

    • Smoking
    • History of bleeding disorders or easy bruising
    • Use of any medications, over-the-counter medicines, or herbal supplements
    • Sensitivity or allergy to latex, medicines, or anesthesia

    Be sure to discuss these risks with your doctor before the procedure.