Pyloroplasty -- Child

The pylorus is the opening between the stomach and the intestines. A pyloroplasty is a surgery to make the pylorus opening wider. Pyloric Sphincter—PyloroplastyCopyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • Call Your Doctor

    After your child leaves the hospital, contact the doctor if any of the following occur:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or any discharge from the incision site
    • Persistent nausea and/or vomiting
    • Pain that your child cannot control with the medications given
    • Cough or shortness of breath
    • Severe abdominal pain or vomiting blood
    • Dark-colored, tarry stools or blood in the stool

    If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    The pylorus is the opening between the stomach and the intestines. A pyloroplasty is a surgery to make the pylorus opening wider.

    Pyloric Sphincter—Pyloroplasty
    Nucleus Image
    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure


    The pylorus opens and closes to allow food to pass to the intestines. Certain conditions can make this area thicker. This can make it difficult for food to pass. The condition is called
    pyloric stenosis. It can cause severe symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, and
    dehydration.

    Pyloroplasty is done to widen the opening. It can treat this condition.

  • Possible Complications

    Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your child's doctor will review potential problems, like:

    • Bleeding
    • Infection
    • Damage to intestines
    • Hernia formation at the incision site

    Before the procedure, talk to your child's doctor factors that may increase the risk of complications, such as:

    • Current bleeding disorders
    • Prior surgeries in the abdomen
    • Malnutrition or dehydration
    • Chronic diseases, such as heart or lung conditions