Rotator Cuff Repair

The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles in the shoulder and upper arm. The muscles help to move the arm at the shoulder and to stabilize the joint. The muscles are connected to the shoulder bone by tendons, which are strong, flexible cords. The muscles or tendons may become damaged from long term overuse or from injury.

  • Call Your Doctor

    After arriving home, contact your doctor if any of the following occurs:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge at the incision site
    • Pain cannot be controlled with medications given
    • Nausea or vomiting
    • Cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain
    • The stitches or staples come apart

    If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    The rotator cuff is a group of four muscles in the shoulder and upper arm. The muscles help to move the arm at the shoulder and to stabilize the joint. The muscles are connected to the shoulder bone by tendons, which are strong, flexible cords. The muscles or tendons may become damaged from long term overuse or from injury.

    Rotator Cuff Tear
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  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    Your doctor may recommend this procedure for:

    • A rotator cuff injury which does not respond to rest and physical therapy treatment

    • A complete
      tear
      in the tendon
    • Chronic pain and weakness from a partial tear in the tendon

  • Possible Complications

    Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your doctor will review potential problems, like:

    • Infection
    • Excess bleeding
    • Blood clots
    • Reaction to anesthesia
    • Weakness or numbness in shoulder joint
    • Detachment of the shoulder muscle
    • The operation does not provide the desired improvement in function

    The risk of complications and slow healing
    may be increased.

    • Smoking
    • Alcohol abuse
    • Obesity
    • Diabetes or other chronic disease