Septoplasty

Septoplasty is a surgery to straighten a deviated septum. The septum is the wall dividing the left and right nasal cavities. It is made of cartilage and bone and is lined with a thin mucus membrane. A normal septum is straight and in the center of the nose. A deviated septum is bent or off-center. Septal deviation may occur during development in the womb, during birth, as your nose grows, or after a traumatic injury. Septoplasty may be done at the same time as other nasal surgery, like rhinoplasty.

  • Call Your Doctor

    It is important for you to monitor your recovery after you leave the care center. Alert your doctor to any problems right away. If any of the following occur, call your doctor:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or discharge from the incision site
    • Heavy bleeding
    • Packing from your nose falls into the back of your throat, causing discomfort
    • Persistent nausea and/or vomiting
    • Vomit that is bloody or the color of coffee grounds
    • Pain that you cannot control with the medications you have been given
    • Cough, shortness of breath, or chest pain

    If you think you have an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition


    Septoplasty is a surgery to straighten a
    deviated septum. The septum is the wall dividing the left and right nasal cavities. It is made of cartilage and bone and is lined with a thin mucus membrane.


    A normal septum is straight and in the center of the nose. A deviated septum is bent or off-center. Septal deviation may occur during development in the womb, during birth, as your nose grows, or after a traumatic injury. Septoplasty may be done at the same time as other nasal surgery, like
    rhinoplasty.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure


    Septoplasty is considered if a deviated septum obstructs your nasal passages. The obstruction can cause impaired nasal breathing,
    sinus infections,
    obstructive sleep apnea, recurrent
    nose bleeds, or a runny nose. A deviated septum may also need to be corrected with septoplasty if it causes chronic headaches.

    Deviated Nasal Septum
    Nucleus image
    Copyright © Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.

  • Possible Complications

    Problems from the procedure are rare, but all procedures have some risk. Your doctor will review potential problems, like:

    • Numbness in the tip of the nose or upper front teeth
    • Bleeding
    • Infection
    • Scarring
    • Septal perforation—a hole in the septum
    • No improvement in symptoms
    • Poor cosmetic outcome

    Before your procedure, talk to your doctor about ways to manage factors that may increase your risk of complications such as:

    • Smoking
    • Drinking
    • Chronic diseases, such as diabetes or obesity