Stereotactic Radiosurgery

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a way to treat brain disorders. It uses highly focused beams of radiation to target specific areas of the brain. It can also be used on other parts of the body, such as the spine. The beams of radiation destroy the tissue that a neurosurgeon would have removed during an operation.

  • Call Your Doctor

    After arriving home, contact your doctor if any of the following occurs:

    • Signs of infection, including fever and chills
    • Redness, swelling, increasing pain, excessive bleeding, or any discharge from the pin sites
    • Nausea and/or vomiting that you cannot control with the medicines you were given after surgery. Or, nausea and/or vomiting that lasts more than two days after discharge from the hospital
    • Pain that you cannot control with the medicines you have been given
    • Cough, shortness of breath, irregular heart beat, or chest pain
    • Severe headache
    • Weakness, loss of balance
    • Vision problems
    • Seizures
    • Any new symptoms, including numbness

    In case of an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a way to treat brain disorders. It uses highly focused beams of radiation to target specific areas of the brain. It can also be used on other parts of the body, such as the spine. The beams of radiation destroy the tissue that a neurosurgeon would have removed during an operation.

  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    SRS is used to:

    • Stop cancerous and noncancerous tumor growth
    • Shrink cancerous and noncancerous tumors

    • Close off
      arteriovenous malformations
      (AVMs)—abnormal blood vessels that disrupt blood flow to the brain

    • Treat disorders such as:

      • Trigeminal neuralgia—a condition that causes facial pain
      • Epilepsy—a disorder that causes seizures

    Brain Tumor
    Nucleus Image
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  • Possible Complications