Suprapubic Cystostomy

Suprapubic cystostomy is a procedure to help drain the bladder (organ that collects and holds urine). A tube called a catheter, which leads out of the lower abdomen, is inserted to drain the bladder.

  • Call Your Doctor

    After you leave the hospital, call your doctor if any of the following occurs:

    • Pain or cramps
    • Redness or soreness around the catheter site
    • Catheter fails to drain
    • Catheter falls outs
    • Changes in frequency, odor, appearance, or volume of urine
    • Signs of infection, including fever or chills
    • Bloody urine

    In case of an emergency, call for medical help right away.

  • Definition

    Suprapubic cystostomy is a procedure to help drain the bladder (organ that collects and holds urine). A tube called a catheter, which leads out of the lower abdomen, is inserted to drain the bladder.

    Bladder and Urethra (Female)
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  • What to Expect

  • Reasons for Procedure

    This procedure is done if you cannot urinate and a catheter cannot be passed through your urethra to help you urinate. The urethra is where urine passes out of the body from the bladder. Urine may not be able pass through the urethra due to:

    • Narrowing of the urethra

    • Other blockage due to:

      • Kidney stones
      • Inflammation
      • Infection
      • Injury
      • Prostate disease (in men)


    The procedure may also be done if you need to:

    • Avoid damaging the urethra
    • Have surgery on the urethra or nearby structures
    • Have a catheter in your body long-term

  • Possible Complications

    Complications are rare, but no procedure is completely free of risk. Your doctor will review a list of possible complications, which may include:

    • Damage to the bowel or other surrounding structures
    • Need for a repeat procedure
    • Infection
    • Bleeding
    • Blood clots
    • Anesthesia reaction

    Before your procedure, talk to your doctor about ways to manage factors that may increase your risk of complications such as:

    • Smoking
    • Drinking
    • Chronic disease such as diabetes or obesity

    Your risk of complications may also increase if you have:

    • Bleeding disorders
    • Taken medications that reduce blood clotting
    • Had previous abdominal surgery
    • Bladder cancer