Response

Some of our early broadcast messages informed team members and physicians where and how information was being posted. Updates were shared on our intranet using an emergency banner running across the top of the site. We shared much of the same information via email, on Orlando Health’s public homepage and social media channels such as Facebook and Twitter, and with the media.

 

In addition to situational updates, early messages included information to leaders, team members and physicians about:

 

  • When and where support sessions for team members and physicians were being held.
  • How leaders can help their teams after a crisis.
  • How to ensure patient privacy and protect PHI.
  • How to handle celebrities who came to the hospital to visit our patients.
  • How to be a patient advocate and appropriately and courteously inform family members and friends of the patients’ need for rest.
  • Where to route the influx of calls and inquiries related to donations, volunteer services and in-kind donations.

 

We also posted many messages and videos of respect and thanks. Early videos included a heartfelt message from our President and CEO, a team member video called Keep Dancing Orlando, and later a Pulse video tribute. These videos collectively received more than 130,000 views.

 

The department followed the basic rules of crisis/emergency communications. We shared information about: the incident sent to the media, any agencies that were present on campus, lockdown status, codes, street closures and anything else that could affect team members. Most importantly we crafted messages informing team members which policies to reference and follow, and how to respond to the ever-increasing media presence.

 

I remained in the command center 24 hours, continuing to broadcast messages, and was relieved by one of my colleagues the morning of June 13. Throughout the event from home and then on Monday from the office, members of the Internal Communication team helped to post messages using all available communication channels. Pulse messaging continued for many weeks after the event.